The return of brush script lettering

Is it just me or is the brush script lettering style making a comeback?

Is it just me or is the brush script lettering style making a comeback? Originally popularised by the advertising of the 1940s and 50s, brush script lost its appeal when the rational grid based Swiss Style emerged in the 1960s.

While brush script is often avoided due to its tendency to look, well, kind of corny, I am noticing many designers reclaiming its place in more thoughtful solutions. Brush lettering adds a sense of fun and irreverence, especially when coupled with more formal typefaces.

Here are a few examples I found today:

1. Brand New Conference 2011

The concept of the materials stems from the hand-drawn, brush lettering that was originally inspired by small grocery stores, bodegas, and buying things on sale by the pound. So we extended the idea of blowout sale prices to the t-shirt, tote bag, and sketchbook by just listing the production price on the front.

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

2. “Golden Tree” music video

A professional display of 50 No Handed Bike Moves performed to “Golden Tree” by Martin Brooks. Video by Ninian Doff.

 

3. Suti font by Mika Melvas

Suti Font

4. Sweet Skateboard decks

Deck designs by Albin Holmqvist for a Swedish skateboard company called Sweet Skateboards.

Sweet Skateboards

Sweet Skateboards

Sweet Skateboards

5. Fonts for AnOther Magazine

Aspic and Asphalt fonts designed by AnOther Magazine’s creative director Gareth Hague.

AnOther Magazine

AnOther Magazine

Just a fad or is brush script back for good? Any other noteworthy examples you can think of?

Author: Imar

Imar Krige is a professional graphic designer and typography enthusiast from Cape Town, South Africa.

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