Font created for Rio 2016 Olympics

The essence of passion and transformation is reflected in this font designed specially for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games…

The spirit  of “Harmonious Diversity” is captured in this font designed by the Brazilian Dalton Maag team for the for Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

The strong contrast between thick and thin strokes was explored during the design process by putting brush to paper and writing by hand. The variety of the curves in the different letters has a unique informality, inspired by the joyfulness of the Brazilian people.

Rio 2016 font

Rio 2016 font

Rio 2016 font

Here are a few images of the design process:

Rio 2016 font

Rio 2016 font

Rio 2016 font

The letter “r”, inspired by Pedra da Gávea:

Rio 2016 font

Fluid lines, simulating the agility of the athletes’ movements:

Rio 2016 font

The letter “m”, inspired by the Copacabana sidewalk:

Rio 2016 font

Read more at Rio2016.org.

Fresh Nike T-shirt designs

These typographic T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal may just change my mind about Nike…

I have never owned a single item of Nike clothing, I guess the brand image just doesn’t really appeal to me. However, these typographic T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal may just change my mind about that!

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

How about this ambigram! (turn the design upside down and it remains the same)

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Nike T-shirt designs by Mats Ottdal

Calligraphic inspiration and upside down Ns

Two calligraphy blogs to inspire your hand lettering and the strange phenomenon of the upside down N…

1. Calligraphica

If you’re into hand lettering and particularly calligraphy, there’s a new Tumblr you might like. It’s called calligraphi.ca. Go and take a look, in most cases the materials used are documented below the picture which makes it quite useful.

Calligraphi.ca

Calligraphi.ca

Calligraphi.ca

Calligraphi.ca

Calligraphi.ca

Calligraphi.ca

2. Calligraffiti

In the same vein, another blog of interest is Calligraffiti.nl documenting the work of Amsterdam based Niels Shoe Meulman.

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

Calligraffiti by Niels Shoe Meulman

3. Upside down N

And lastly something quirky: Meulman (mentioned above) has been documenting the incorrect use of serif Ns in signage around the world. In his own words:

From an early age on, I’ve noticed signs where an N with serif is placed upside down. This awareness is the first thing that triggered me to become a graphic artist.

To spot upside down N’s you must travel. Upside down serif N’s are everywhere. And nowhere.

For more examples of this phenomenon, check out upsidedownn.com, you are even invited to submit your own finds.

Upside down N

Upside down N

Upside down N

Upside down N

Upside down N

Upside down N

Fast Company’s fantastic new fonts

In September 2011 Fast Company introduced three new typefaces to their print publication. Kaiser, Zizou Sans and Zizou Slab were all commissioned as part of a design overhaul.

In September 2011 Fast Company introduced three new typefaces to their print publication.

Kaiser, Zizou Sans and Zizou Slab were all commissioned  from Commercial Type by Fast Company’s creative director Florian Bachleda as part of a design overhaul. Co. Design, one of the magazine’s online counterparts launched their redesign four months later, using specially hinted versions of Kaiser and Zizou Slab to great effect.

Kaiser:

New Fast Company fonts

Conceptualised by Christian Schwartz and Florian Bachleda as a hybrid of a condensed sans they discovered in an old German specimen book and Paul Renner’s Plak, it was expanded into a full range of widths by Vincent Chan.

New Fast Company fonts

New Fast Company fonts

New Fast Company fonts

Zizou Sans:

New Fast Company fonts

New Fast Company fonts

Christian Schwartz gives us a glimpse into his Zizou Sans design process:

It originally began as my attempt to draw Antique Olive from memory, but ended up with its own distinct personality. I surprised myself with what I remembered correctly (i.e. the swing to the top of the bottom bowl in the lowercase a, and the distinctive top of the lowercase t), but was impressed by just how wrong I was able to get certain things. So much for my photographic memory for type!

Zizou Slab:

New Fast Company fonts

Schwartz on the design of the slab serif version:

I decided to start from the simplest place I could – snapping rectangular slabs onto the sans with a minimum of contrast – to see what that would yield before I tried to be any more clever with the design.

New Fast Company fonts

Almost too easy!

New Fast Company fonts

New Fast Company fonts

New Fast Company fonts

I always find it fascinating how a font looks exponentially more interesting and lively seen in use compared to a plain specimen, don’t you think?

Modern hand lettering of India

Two interesting type-related snippets came across my desk this week, both from India: hand drawn movie posters from Bangalore and digital fonts created from the lettering of street painters in Delhi…

Two interesting typographic snippets came across my desk this week, both from India:

1. HandpaintedType

The initiative of Delhi based designer Hanif Kureshi, HandpaintedType is a collaborative project aimed at capturing the rapidly-disappearing lettering styles of street painters across India.

The idea is to document the particular typographic style of individual sign painters. Each artist pruduces a character set on canvas, which is redrawn digitally and eventually released as a commercially available font. Apparently 50% of the proceeds from every font sale goes to the painter and the other half is invested in the continuation of the project.

Here’s an example of an original character set, hand painted in Old Delhi by an artist called Kafeel:

Hand painted lettering from India

Hand painted lettering from India

Due to the multicoloured nature of the Indian street typography, once digitised, each font consists of different layers; a base shape with shadows and highlights. These can then be used in different colour combinations to create the full effect:

Hand painted lettering from India

Hand painted lettering from India

Hand painted lettering from India

Find out more from handpaintedtype.com.

2. Hand drawn movie posters

“Dean Pickles” of Asia Obscura came across a factory north of Bangalore, where a man called Ramachandraiah prints movie posters for a living, using a lithographic press from 1901.

His [posters] are five-color, hand-drawn, and measure just 20 inches by 30 inches. They’re printed on thin paper, and illegally slapped up on building sites and highway overpasses late at night. They cost pennies to print. And they’re absolutely gorgeous.

The artist, Raju, speedily draws these posters at a  small desk on the sidewalk – about one artwork every three hours!

Raju drawing movie posters

These are the result:

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Hand drawn movie posters from India

Amazing, aren’t they? For more on the subject, see part one and part two of the story on Asia Obscura.

Friday find: Nice Type videos

Look, a channel on Vimeo dedicated to typographic videos! And did you know there are such things as pre-animated typefaces? I learn something new every day…

Big news in the world of online video this week is that Vimeo is launching a major overhaul of their site. While checking out their announcement page, I noticed this screenshot saying Nice Type in big blue and red letters:

Nice Type on Vimeo

It turns out Nice Type is a channel moderated by Matthew Buchanan where he collects all the best typographic videos from around Vimeo. Now isn’t that nice?

Here’s a little something to whet your appetite:

If you can’t see the video here, watch it on Vimeo.

What you see above is a demo for an animated typeface called Binary 2.0 created by Dutch studio Calango in collaboration with Maria Jose Torrero Heredia of Mexico:

Binary 2.0 animated typeface

Binary 2.0 animated typeface

What the bleep is an animated typeface you ask? I have to be honest, this is the first time I hear of the concept too. Apparently it comes with pre-animated characters of which you can edit the colors, duration, easing and line thickness in Adobe After Effects. This definitely calls for some further investigation…

Cool title screens: The Master Cleanse

Some clever title screen lettering by Erik Marinovich perfectly captures the mood of this short film.

Friends of Type recently reported on Erik Marinovich’s process in designing the title screens for a short film entitled The Master Cleanse.

I really like the way the bright yellow and white smeared lettering creates a perfect visual paradox: clean yet grimy. As the days go by and the relationship of the main characters becomes strained, the build-up of tension is reflected in the lettering – another clever touch by Erik:

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

The Master Cleanse title screens

Nice site: Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company has not forgotten the reason we designers got all excited about the prospect of web fonts in the first place: the ability to use real fonts for typographic design instead of replacing text with images…

I don’t often feature websites on here. I guess the whole web font “revolution” of the last two years has sent designers into a flurry of experimentation and the results are often a little underwhelming.

People like Jason Santa Maria and Trent Walton have been nudging us in the right direction, showing us the power that this culmination of typographic awareness, innovation and browser support holds. As we all know, with great power comes great responsibility, and in exploring this new frontier, best practices have been something of a grey area.

But hey, let’s not forget the reason we designers got all excited about the prospect of web fonts in the first place: the ability to use real fonts for typographic design instead of replacing text with images!

Without analysing the design of Cast Iron Design Company‘s website, I simply want to commend them on taking advantage of this ability. The design duo from Tucson, Arizona has made liberal use of web fonts (via Typekit) and CSS3 techniques throughout.

I was a little disappointed though, to find that the header design (which differs from page to page) makes use of image replacement instead of real fonts. Come on guys, you have taken it this far, now how about those headers?

*throws down the gauntlet…*

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

To see it for yourself, go to Cast Iron Design Company.

Vintage punk rock flyers get swissted

Hey, remember when Jack Black and Mos Def sweded VHS movies in Be Kind Rewind? Well, Swissted is kind of like that, only with punk gig flyers…

Hey, remember when Jack Black and Mos Def sweded VHS movies in Be Kind Rewind (2008)? Well, swissted, an ongoing project by NYC based designer Mike Joyce, is kind of like that…

Only, instead of recreating feature films in a low-fi fashion, he recreates punk rock gig flyers as Swiss style posters. So basically he is taking the punk out of punk, and what could possibly be more punk than that! Odd, but brilliant. (As a loyal supporter of both punk rock and typography, this is right up my alley.)

The number of flyers Mike has swissted is nothing short of astounding – at the time of writing this there are over 200 examples in the gallery! Of course he also has some rules: all posters are 35.5 inches wide by 50 inches high, all set in berthold akzidenz grotesk medium, all lowercase and all the shows actually happened.

Here are but a few examples:

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Little Printer – your personal mini newspaper machine!

You remember a while back I wrote about how London based design agency BERG redesigned the common sales receipt? Well, guess what, that was really just a sneak preview of what BERG has really been working on for the past year…

Wow, this has got me all excited, because it’s not often that an invention comes along which just seems way too cool to be real.

You remember a while back I wrote about how London based design agency BERG redesigned the common sales receipt? Everyone thought it was a cool idea and all, but that it could probably never be implemented in real life… Well, guess what, that was really just a sneak preview of what BERG has really been working on for the past year – they call it Little Printer:

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

If you can’t see the video below, click here to watch it on Vimeo.

Just when you thought print was dead, this wicked little device emerges to combine retro technology with cloud computing.

Little Printer lives in your front room and scours the Web on your behalf, assembling the content you care about into designed deliveries a couple of times a day.

Little Printer holds a compact, inkless, thermal printer. Its zero-configuration wireless connection to the Web lets you place it wherever you have a power outlet.

Graphic design is at the heart of everything Little Printer delivers, making the most of connectivity and print combined. Rendered in crisp black and white these tactile publications take visual cues from traditional halftone lithography and modern pixel art.

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

You subscribe to the “publications” you wish to receive from your iPhone or Android smartphone. BERG has already partnered with influential content providers like Google, FourSquare, Nike, The Guardian and more.

Right on time Little Printer gathers everything it needs to prepare a neat little personalised package, printed as soon as you press the button.

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

Berg London announces Little Printer and Berg Cloud

A second and equally important announcement is BERG Cloud, the online technology which will compile your personalised mini newspaper and wirelessly communicate it to Little Printer through a “bridge unit”.

The announcement of Little Printer is accompanied by a beautifully designed website where you can find out more and sign up for updates on the project.

Pre-orders for Little Printer will open in 2012, when it launches as in ‘beta’. Added to the wishlist!

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Hans Gremmen of Amsterdam procured this great set of Lucha Libre posters from a letterpress print shop in Mexico City in 2009. Hard to believe that an outdated printing technique can trump the efficiency of digital production in the 21st century. Here’s the proof…

Hans Gremmen of Amsterdam procured this great set of Lucha Libre posters from a letterpress print shop in Mexico City in 2009. I find the following account from Hans truly amazing:

The frequency of these fights is high, which means that new posters are made nonstop. The process of making these posters is therefore very efficient. The technique (letterpress) can provide this efficiency. There is no digital process, no plates, no pre-press. All the fonts, illustrations, sponsor logo’s, lines are already available in the workshop; they only have to be placed in the right order. The printer compiles the posters on the press himself, using these prefab materials. The colours (mostly rainbow-print) are also mixed on the press.

Hard to believe that an outdated printing technique can trump the efficiency of digital production in the 21st century. Here’s the proof:

The posters:

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

The setup:

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

The metal pieces are placed in position on the press.

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

A large selection of luchador masks ready to be placed in the composition on the press.

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

The ink is mixed and printing is a go!

Lucha Libre letterpress posters from Mexico City

Done. Maravilloso!

The quest for an average font

The fascinating explorations in finding an average of all existing fonts has lead different people down different roads, here are some examples…

In September 2011 Viennese designer Moritz Resl published a typographic experiment called Average Font on his website. The project received widespread attention on the internet, drawing both criticism and praise. The idea is to show what a font would look like if it were made up of all the Typefaces on his system at the time. Resl achieved this by layering over 900 different fonts each with a low opacity, one on top of the other. The result is a blurry, yet recognisable rendition of each character:

Average Font by Moritz Resl

As Stephen Coles of Typographica points out, the quest to find an average font is not unexplored territory. In 2006 visualisation expert W. Bradford Paley from New York put together an exploration of Face Variations, layering the outlines of 166 fonts in different combinations. Paley notes that this stems from his fascination with finding the “perceptual boundaries” around objects such as letters:

Face Variations by W. Bradford Paley

Another approach comes in the form of The neutral typeface – the result of a 2005 graduation project by Dutch designer Kai Bernau entitled Neutrality. The measurements for the design of the typeface are derived from averages reached by comparing popular existing sans serif typefaces:

The neutral typeface by Kai Bernau

The latest arrival at the average font party is Avería, a font released in October 2011 by Dan Sayers combining 725 existing fonts. Sayers explored different methods, eventually opting for a programmatic approach to the task by splitting each letter perimeter into hundreds of equally-spaced points, then finding the average between the corresponding positions of each:

Avería by Dan Sayers

Avería by Dan Sayers

Also take a look at Font Path Viewer, a web app Sayers built in order to view the outlines and control points of fonts during his process.

Fonts come in an endless array of personalities and proportions, weights and styles. Maybe it is the sheer overwhelming variety, or maybe our inborn desire to simplify and reorganise, but whatever the reason may be, people seem to be captivated by the idea of finding a neutral average. The search continues.

MoMA’s in-house design studio

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City has a very productive in-house design team with a bulging portfolio of exhibition designs, advertising campaigns and other printed materials…

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City (MoMA) has an in-house design department very practically named The Department of Advertising and
Graphic Design
.

They are responsible for exhibition designs, advertising campaigns and any printed materials needed by the museum’s numerous departments including curatorial, education and visitor services.

If we learned anything from the career of Wim Crouwel it is that working for a museum provides fertile ground for typographic exploration. The MoMA team’s impressive portfolio suggests that this is indeed the case:

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

MoMA Department of Advertising and Graphic Design

Interactive type design game

Hey, remember that kerning game from a couple of weeks ago? Well there’s a new game which is a little more challenging: Shape Type.

Hey, remember that kerning game from a couple of weeks ago? Well there’s a new letter shaping game, also created for Method of Action by Mark Mackay.

What is the point of these games? Well, it’s not quite clear to me, but Method of Action claims to be launching a design course for programmers soon and their blog hints at the possibility that these games will be playing a role:

When Method of Action launches, you’re going to need at least 90/100 to pass this mission, so get practicing!

In my opinion shaping letters is a little more challenging than kerning. The characters are all from well known typefaces, so the result is much less subjective than that of the kerning game. Success depends heavily on your ability to recognise aesthetic correctness of a character’s curves, so give Shape Type a whirl and see how you fare. Oh, and don’t forget to Tweet your score!

Shape Type - a letter shaping game

Lovely posters letterpressed by Typoretum

Letterpress is essentially the very earliest method of printing text, invented by Gutenberg in the 1400s. Print shops like Typoretum are reviving this old fashioned art…

Typoretum is a print shop located in the small town of Coggeshall in Essex, England. They specialise in the old fashioned art of letterpress printing.

Letterpress is essentially the very earliest method of printing text, invented by Gutenberg in the 1400s. A print is created by inking reversed movable metal or wood type and then pressing it onto paper using a wonderfully complex machine.

Part of the novelty of letterpress prints are their tactile nature – the “bite” of the raised letters leaves a slightly embossed impression, and due to the manual work involved no two prints are exactly alike. These qualities have caused a recent resurgence in the popularity of this archaic printing technique.

Take a look at these nice letterpress posters for sale from Typoretum, and the snapshots of the process behind them:

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Letterpress posters from Typoretum

Jack Daniel’s label update – part two

About four months ago I mentioned that the Jack Daniel’s label design was being updated. Well, here’s the latest on the subject…

Remember about four months ago I mentioned that the iconic Jack Daniel’s label design was being updated?

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Well, Cue, the agency responsible for this daunting task, updated their website earlier this week with a case study and details of Jack’s new look. Here are a couple of their thoughts on the redesign:

The brand’s values are timeless, but like every great brand, it needed to evolve to maintain its strength and affirm its authenticity. We evaluated the equity of the brand elements, then edited carefully to clarify their meaning. The new label maintains a balance of filigree, iconography, and special typographic elements, in black and white with a touch of silver.

New Jack Daniel’s label:

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

A closer look at details of the packaging applied to the new chiseled bottle shape :

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Elements of the updated identity system:

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

An important accompaniment to the new design – The Jack Daniel’s brand guide:

Jack Daniel's booklet by Cue

New Jack Daniel’s is also introducing a new product, Tennessee Honey, which features a unique design incorporating the traditional brand elements :

Jack Daniel's Honey label design by Cue

Jack Daniel's Honey label design by Cue

Found via Allan Peters.

Cool interactive kerning game

This is the perfect form of procrastination. Not only will you be putting off that important thing you need to do, you will be sharpening up on your typographic skills at the same time!

Type nerds alert! Here’s a super fun kerning game to try your hand at: type.method.ac.

Created in HTML5 by Mark MacKay this is the perfect form of procrastination. Not only will you be putting off that important thing you need to do, you will be sharpening up on your typographic skills at the same time. Each of your ten solutions will be compared to a crowdsourced solution and scored based on similarity. If you feel your solution is better than the one suggested by the game, you are able to submit it.

Kerning Game

Air tickets reimagined as an app

Sometimes we need to cross the boundaries set by a particular medium or technology in order to challenge the status quo of design.

Earlier this month Sylion launched their new iPhone app Flight Card.

Flight Card is a beautiful, simple and intuitive flight tracking application for your iPhone or iPod touch. Search your flight by flight # or by route, track it and share with family and friends!

Flight Card

Flight Card

Sylion mention in their blog post announcing Flight Card that the concept was inspired by Tyler Thompson’s 2010 reinvention of his boarding pass. I love the minimal approach and the elegant condensed typeface used, which is very similar to Tyler’s original concept:

Boarding pass redesigned by Tyler Thompson

Boarding pass redesigned by Tyler Thompson

Since thermal printers and the systems that produce real-world boarding passes impose so many limitations on innovation, we will not be seeing Tyler’s redesign implemented at airports anytime soon. That’s why it’s awesome that we are able to employ another medium altogether, such as the iPhone, and challenge the status quo!

The return of brush script lettering

Is it just me or is the brush script lettering style making a comeback?

Is it just me or is the brush script lettering style making a comeback? Originally popularised by the advertising of the 1940s and 50s, brush script lost its appeal when the rational grid based Swiss Style emerged in the 1960s.

While brush script is often avoided due to its tendency to look, well, kind of corny, I am noticing many designers reclaiming its place in more thoughtful solutions. Brush lettering adds a sense of fun and irreverence, especially when coupled with more formal typefaces.

Here are a few examples I found today:

1. Brand New Conference 2011

The concept of the materials stems from the hand-drawn, brush lettering that was originally inspired by small grocery stores, bodegas, and buying things on sale by the pound. So we extended the idea of blowout sale prices to the t-shirt, tote bag, and sketchbook by just listing the production price on the front.

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

Brand New Conference 2011

2. “Golden Tree” music video

A professional display of 50 No Handed Bike Moves performed to “Golden Tree” by Martin Brooks. Video by Ninian Doff.

 

3. Suti font by Mika Melvas

Suti Font

4. Sweet Skateboard decks

Deck designs by Albin Holmqvist for a Swedish skateboard company called Sweet Skateboards.

Sweet Skateboards

Sweet Skateboards

Sweet Skateboards

5. Fonts for AnOther Magazine

Aspic and Asphalt fonts designed by AnOther Magazine’s creative director Gareth Hague.

AnOther Magazine

AnOther Magazine

Just a fad or is brush script back for good? Any other noteworthy examples you can think of?

Win this awesome graphic design book

Graphic Design, Referenced is a visual and informational guide to the most commonly referenced terms, historical moments, landmark projects, and influential practitioners in the field of graphic design. Here’s how to win a copy…

Update – 22 September 2011: Competition closed! Congratulations to our winner Christina Vanko!

Graphic Design, Referenced

Typedeck has one copy of Graphic Design, Referenced to give away.

Graphic Design, Referenced is a visual and informational guide to the most commonly referenced terms, historical moments, landmark projects, and influential practitioners in the field of graphic design. With more than 2,000 design projects illustrating more than 400 entries, it provides an intense overview of the varied elements that make up the graphic design profession.

Authors Bryony Gomez-Palacio and Armin Vit are co-founders of UnderConsideration.

How to win:

  1. Follow Typedeck on Twitter and tweet about it
  2. Like Typedeck on Facebook to increase your chances

The winner will be announced on Twitter and Facebook in a week’s time (on the 22nd of September 2011).

Graphic Design, Referenced

Graphic Design, Referenced

Graphic Design, Referenced

Six Word Story Every Day

There is an urban legend that claims Ernest Hemingway once wrote a short story in no more than six words and it goes like this…

There is an urban legend that claims Ernest Hemingway once wrote a short story in no more than six words and it goes like this:

For sale: baby shoes, never worn.

Inspired to keep the legend alive, designer Anne Ulku, and writer Van Horgen teamed up in 2010 to create Six Word Story Every Day. The project was concluded and all 365 of their creations can be found at sixwordstoryeveryday.blogspot.com.

But that was not the endSix Word Story Every Day lives happily ever after in 2011 in the form of a crowd fueled platform for word lovers to contribute their own works. Below are a few examples, and there are plenty more on the site with one new story being added daily.

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Six Word Story Every Day

Found via designworklife.

Jason Santa Maria rethinks his website

Who would launch the tenth anniversary redesign of their website on a Friday afternoon? Well, probably only Jason Santa Maria. His twitter bio sums up his unfortunate predicament: “Designer by day, designer by night.”

Who would launch the tenth anniversary redesign of their website on a Friday afternoon? Well, probably only Jason Santa Maria. His twitter bio sums up his unfortunate predicament: “Designer by day, designer by night.”

Based in Brooklyn, New York, Jason has positioned himself as the godfather of modern typographic resources – here are a few of the offices he currently holds:

  • Co-founder of Typedia, which as the name suggests is an online encyclopedia of typefaces
  • Creative director for Typekit, a subscription-based service offering hosted web fonts
  • Lecturer for the Interaction Design program at the School of Visual Arts in NYC
  • Creative director for the online web magazine A List Apart
  • Co-founder/designer of ALA’s publishing wing A Book Apart

The other projects and events he is involved in are innumerable, so instead of trying to figure out whether Jason has a clone army or just never sleeps, go over and take a look at the latest incarnation of jasonsantamaria.com.

The previous version of his website/blog introduced the concept of a custom design for each article as opposed to having entries conform to a rigid template, but this posed an unforeseen problem:

In order to post something, I felt it couldn’t be short or just a quip on a topic, it had to be substantial. I fell into a design trap I unknowingly set for myself. – Jason Santa Maria

Here’s a screenshot of the new home page design which allows posts of various lengths to co-exist in one stream. It features one of my favourite fonts Chaparral for most of the text:

Jason Santa Maria website redesign

Personally I don’t think he is breaking new ground with this less-is-more offering, but when Jason Santa Maria redesigns it is always worth sitting up, taking a good hard look and perhaps even a leaf or two from his book…

Linotype: The Film

Doug Wilson of I Love Typography is directing a feature-length film which aims to uncover the surprising and passionate stories of the people behind the forgotten art of Linotype printing.

Doug Wilson of I Love Typography fame is directing a feature-length film about the Linotype type casting machine. Invented by Ottmar Mergenthaler in 1886, the Linotype revolutionized printing, but newer technologies rendered these complex machines obsolete by the mid 1900s. Linotype: The Film aims to uncover the surprising and passionate stories of the people behind this forgotten art.

Doug and his crew have now launched a second Kickstarter project to fund the final push to cover post-production expenses. They are hoping for the film to premiere early 2012.

Bring it to Cape Town, Doug! I’m sure Design Indaba would love to screen it.

“Linotype: The Film” Official Trailer from Linotype: The Film on Vimeo.

Via: I Love Typography

Zerply – a professional network that employs typography to net users

From the end of the alphabet to the tip of your tongue, Zerply is the tech startup everyone is tweeting about this week. So, why do these guys think they can they give LinkedIn a run for their money?

From the end of the alphabet to the tip of your tongue, Zerply is the tech startup everyone is tweeting about this week. So, why do these guys think they can they give LinkedIn a run for their money? Well, because Tina Roth Eisenberg (aka Swiss Miss) says so. Her blog post about Zerply sent the online design community into a sign-up flurry causing Zerply’s servers to take some strain.

I must confess I was among those who took a renewed interest and signed up right away. I remember taking a look at Zerply back in February after Styleboost posted about the design, but I didn’t take much further notice.

Swiss Miss’s traffic has skewed their current user base toward creative types, but maybe they are the intended target audience after all? Take a look at the leading tags and skills currently listed:

Zerply tags and skills

They have certainly tailored the user interface (which is a breeze to use) and public profile themes to appeal to the designer’s discerning eye. There are currently four profile themes to choose from:

Zerply theme - The poster child

↑ The Poster Child by Mike Kus

Zerply theme - The Conservative

↑ The Conservative by Elliot Jay Stocks

Zerply theme - The American

↑ The American by Rogie King

Zerply theme - The Swiss

↑ The Swiss by Luke Beard

And here’s where they really exhibit an understanding of their target user: the fourth theme is locked.

Apart from the fact that the Swiss-style poster theme by their resident designer Luke Beard (the Zerply team all live together in one house!) is rather appealing, the mere fact that it is not available makes it infinitely more desirable. In order to unlock and use the theme, you have to get at least three friends to sign up to Zerply using the unique link they provide you.

Yup, we designers are such suckers for exclusivity. Needless to say I begged, blackmailed and coaxed three friends (ok, one was my sister and one was my wife – I picked easy targets) into signing up.

Check out my profile on Zerply. Goodbye LinkedIn? Maybe…

Dyslexie: A font for people with dyslexia

Dutch graphic designer Christian Boer has designed a font to help those who suffer from dyslexia to minimise reading errors. Drawing on his own experience of dyslexia he made custom tweaks to all the letterforms and punctuation of the western alphabet.

Dutch graphic designer Christian Boer has designed a font to help those who suffer from dyslexia to minimise reading errors. Drawing on his own experience of dyslexia he made custom tweaks to all the letterforms and punctuation of the western alphabet.

Dyslexie example 01

Dyslexie example 02

Dyslexie example 02

“Dyslexie” may not be a conventionally beautiful font, but an independent study by the University of Twente in the Netherlands has concluded that it is effective in minimising dyslexic errors. Who can argue with results?

Via Fast Co. Design and Studio Studio.

It’s official: Typefaces are modern art

MOMA (The Museum of Moden Art in New York) recently acquired 23 digital typefaces for their collection. Although MOMA includes many works featuring typography, the only typeface previously in their collection was 36-point Helvetica Bold lead type.

MOMA (The Museum of Moden Art in New York) recently acquired 23 digital typefaces for their collection. Although MOMA includes many works featuring typography, the only typeface previously in their collection was 36-point Helvetica Bold lead type designed by Max Miedinger in 1956. The oldest of their new acquisitions is OCR-A (1966) and the newest is Gotham (2000).

This first selection of 23 typefaces represent a new branch in our collection tree. They are all digital or designed with a foresight of the scope of the digital revolution, and they all significantly respond to the technological advancements occurring in the second half of the twentieth century. Each is a milestone in the history of typography. – MOMA

OCR-A

Big Caslon

FF DIN

Gotham

See how many of the 23 faces you recognise with @issue’s quiz.

Helvetica redesigned

News of Linotype’s latest typeface offering, Neue Haas Grotesk has swept the typosphere since its release on June 7th. The story goes that the famous digital sans-serif  typeface we know today as Helvetica, was originally designed by Max Miedinger in the ’50s as Neue Haas Grotesk. The conversion from metal type to digital resulted in a one-size-fits-all solution with “unfortunate compromises” to the integrity and character of Helvetica’s predecessor.

NYC based type designer Christian Schwartz has now restored this typeface to its former glory and released it comercially. A common perception in the design fraternity is that “you don’t mess with Helvetica”, so I find it quite interesting that the initial reception in typography circles appears to be positive.

Neue Haas Grotesk does not come without any credentials, the typeface has been put through its paces by Bloomberg Businessweek’s print publication since their redesign last year.

My favourite part is that Schwartz has included some of Miedinger’s alternate characters which have never formed part of Helvetica. Take a look at the flat-legged R:

Neue Haas Grotesk

Read more about the revival of this legendary typeface at:

Wish list: TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One claims to be the first book to focus exclusively on typography in t-shirt design and features over 1700 designs from around the world, covering independent artists to global brands.

T-shirts seem like one of those things that have just always been around, yet the truth is they only claimed their rightful place as a popular wardrobe item around 50 years ago!

TypoShirt One claims to be the first book to focus exclusively on typography in t-shirt design and features over 1700 designs from around the world, covering independent artists to global brands. Compiled by Magma Brand Design in Karlsruhe, Germany and published by Index Book in Barcelona, it looks like a must-have for any type / t-shirt enthusiast.

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One
Jon Contino featured
TypoShirt One
Emil Kozak featured

Via: Emil Kozak.

Fonts in use

This post is about three different, yet related things that caught my attention in recently…

This post is about three different, yet related things that caught my attention recently…

1. Live the language commercials

EF (Education First) released “four short films that will make you want to pack your bags” and travel to Paris, Barcelona, Beijing and London. They got Stockholm based Art director & designer Albin Holmqvist to take care of the beautiful typographic treatment in each video.

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

I am super excited to be visiting Spain soon, so I decided to post the Barcelona video below, but be sure to take a look at the other three commercials too.

EF – Live The Language – Barcelona

2. Fonts in use

The Fonts in Use project is a great idea and is best explained by editor Stephen Coles:

At Fonts In Use we’ll catalog and examine real-world typography wherever it appears — branding, advertising, signage, packaging, publications, in print and online — with an emphasis on the typefaces used.

Parisian fontMr Dafoe fontNeutraface fontBrothers font

Curious about the fonts used by Holmqvist in the Paris commercial? Look no further, Fonts in Use offers a fantastic analysis.

3. Logotypes for EF destinations

Following the success of his work on Live the Language, Holmqvist was commissioned by EF to create logotypes for each of their 40 destinations worldwide including my home city, Cape Town. Below are a couple of examples, see more in his portfolio at albinholmqvist.com.

Cape Town logotype by Albin Holmqvist

Toronto logotype by Albin Holmqvist

San Francisco logotype by Albin Holmqvist

Wood Type Revival

An ambitious project to convert ten of the world’s rarest and most unique historic wood typefaces into digital fonts.

Matt Griffin and Matt Braun of Bearded have started the ambitious project of converting ten of the world’s rarest and most unique historic wood typefaces into digital Opentype fonts. The project has successfully been funded through the Kickstarter platform. They have released a sample of their intended result as a free font called Fatboy, available in the “Husky” weight.

Fatboy Husky font

Follow their progress on woodtyperevival.com or Twitter.