It’s official: Typefaces are modern art

MOMA (The Museum of Moden Art in New York) recently acquired 23 digital typefaces for their collection. Although MOMA includes many works featuring typography, the only typeface previously in their collection was 36-point Helvetica Bold lead type.

MOMA (The Museum of Moden Art in New York) recently acquired 23 digital typefaces for their collection. Although MOMA includes many works featuring typography, the only typeface previously in their collection was 36-point Helvetica Bold lead type designed by Max Miedinger in 1956. The oldest of their new acquisitions is OCR-A (1966) and the newest is Gotham (2000).

This first selection of 23 typefaces represent a new branch in our collection tree. They are all digital or designed with a foresight of the scope of the digital revolution, and they all significantly respond to the technological advancements occurring in the second half of the twentieth century. Each is a milestone in the history of typography. – MOMA

OCR-A

Big Caslon

FF DIN

Gotham

See how many of the 23 faces you recognise with @issue’s quiz.

Helvetica redesigned

News of Linotype’s latest typeface offering, Neue Haas Grotesk has swept the typosphere since its release on June 7th. The story goes that the famous digital sans-serif  typeface we know today as Helvetica, was originally designed by Max Miedinger in the ’50s as Neue Haas Grotesk. The conversion from metal type to digital resulted in a one-size-fits-all solution with “unfortunate compromises” to the integrity and character of Helvetica’s predecessor.

NYC based type designer Christian Schwartz has now restored this typeface to its former glory and released it comercially. A common perception in the design fraternity is that “you don’t mess with Helvetica”, so I find it quite interesting that the initial reception in typography circles appears to be positive.

Neue Haas Grotesk does not come without any credentials, the typeface has been put through its paces by Bloomberg Businessweek’s print publication since their redesign last year.

My favourite part is that Schwartz has included some of Miedinger’s alternate characters which have never formed part of Helvetica. Take a look at the flat-legged R:

Neue Haas Grotesk

Read more about the revival of this legendary typeface at:

Wish list: TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One claims to be the first book to focus exclusively on typography in t-shirt design and features over 1700 designs from around the world, covering independent artists to global brands.

T-shirts seem like one of those things that have just always been around, yet the truth is they only claimed their rightful place as a popular wardrobe item around 50 years ago!

TypoShirt One claims to be the first book to focus exclusively on typography in t-shirt design and features over 1700 designs from around the world, covering independent artists to global brands. Compiled by Magma Brand Design in Karlsruhe, Germany and published by Index Book in Barcelona, it looks like a must-have for any type / t-shirt enthusiast.

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One

TypoShirt One
Jon Contino featured
TypoShirt One
Emil Kozak featured

Via: Emil Kozak.

Fonts in use

This post is about three different, yet related things that caught my attention in recently…

This post is about three different, yet related things that caught my attention recently…

1. Live the language commercials

EF (Education First) released “four short films that will make you want to pack your bags” and travel to Paris, Barcelona, Beijing and London. They got Stockholm based Art director & designer Albin Holmqvist to take care of the beautiful typographic treatment in each video.

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

EF Typography by Albin Holmqvist

I am super excited to be visiting Spain soon, so I decided to post the Barcelona video below, but be sure to take a look at the other three commercials too.

EF – Live The Language – Barcelona

2. Fonts in use

The Fonts in Use project is a great idea and is best explained by editor Stephen Coles:

At Fonts In Use we’ll catalog and examine real-world typography wherever it appears — branding, advertising, signage, packaging, publications, in print and online — with an emphasis on the typefaces used.

Parisian fontMr Dafoe fontNeutraface fontBrothers font

Curious about the fonts used by Holmqvist in the Paris commercial? Look no further, Fonts in Use offers a fantastic analysis.

3. Logotypes for EF destinations

Following the success of his work on Live the Language, Holmqvist was commissioned by EF to create logotypes for each of their 40 destinations worldwide including my home city, Cape Town. Below are a couple of examples, see more in his portfolio at albinholmqvist.com.

Cape Town logotype by Albin Holmqvist

Toronto logotype by Albin Holmqvist

San Francisco logotype by Albin Holmqvist

Wood Type Revival

An ambitious project to convert ten of the world’s rarest and most unique historic wood typefaces into digital fonts.

Matt Griffin and Matt Braun of Bearded have started the ambitious project of converting ten of the world’s rarest and most unique historic wood typefaces into digital Opentype fonts. The project has successfully been funded through the Kickstarter platform. They have released a sample of their intended result as a free font called Fatboy, available in the “Husky” weight.

Fatboy Husky font

Follow their progress on woodtyperevival.com or Twitter.