An interview with Darnyill

“My oldest memory of a drawing was a scuba diver when I was 4. It looked good until I had to draw the water which meant scribbling all over it in blue.” Typedeck finds out a little more about a designer from Cape Town called Darnyill…

Name: Darnyill
Home: Cape Town
Age: 20
Occupation: Student (BA in Art History)
Email: darnyill@live.co.za
Facebook: Facebook.com/Darnyill
Tumblr: Jesusaintdead.tumblr.com

Typedeck: Hey man, so how many years have you been designing?

Darnyill: Well it’s difficult to put a label on ‘designing’, since I’ve always had an obsession for general visuals and well-designed things, but ‘officially’ I started doing layout for my high school magazine when I was 15.

T: What was the first thing you ever drew?

D: I wish I had the exact answer to that, but my oldest memory of a drawing was a scuba diver when I was 4. It looked good until I had to draw the water which meant scribbling all over it in blue.

T: How did you get into designing?

D: Well I’ve always loved drawing as a child. It was my thing. I was the ‘best drawer’ in my class when I was 6. I fucking owned that shit so heavy, I burnt anyone’s ass in a draw off.

By the age of 6 I was bartering drawings for sweets and stationery. But like I said, for my school magazine. My first intent wasn’t to do design, I just liked the committee and when I suggested I could help out with visuals I was given the full layout-artist title and thrown in the deep-end. Which was fun? As I learnt more I got more obsessed.

T: What are your plans for this Year?

D: Right now I’m taking it easy and just going to work on University. Maybe these holidays I might get involved with some zines – I’m actually busy with an illustration for Jungle Jim Magazine (www.junglejim.org)

T: Who inspires you?

D: In terms of the work I do; Siggi Eggertsson, Jordan Metcalf, Daniel Ting Chong, Alex Trochut, ill-studio, Tom Sachs to name but a few.
Otherwise just the small things around me.

T: Where do you see yourself in 10 years?

D: Behind a 30” designing for Nike.

T: What do you do when you’re not designing?

D: Spend too much time drooling over blogs. Cook here and there. Caffeine & Music, always. Wander around. Look at clothes. Whistle. Beat box. I try to do some free ride mountain-biking if I can manage.

T: Any Last words and thanks?

D: Hmm, nothing is all that bad. Ever. And thanks to people reblogging my posts on designersof.com and liking my page on FB. Please do so now: Facebook.com/Darnyill

Thanks!

Click on the Links bellow for Hi res.

Cool wedding invitation inspired by 100 ducks

The muted palette, the mix of wiry lettering and ornaments and of course the quirky ducks make this a fun and stylish wedding invitation.

I really enjoy this wedding invitation design by Adam Hill, aka Velcrosuit, from Cape Town. The muted palette, the mix of wiry lettering and ornaments and of course the quirky ducks! Apparently over 100 of these guys roam the wedding venue, Babylonstoren estate in the Cape Winelands. They obviously made quite an impression on the  couple.

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

Wedding Invitation by Adam Hill

There’s a lot more great design work in Velcrosuit’s portfolio, so be sure to take a gander. No pun intended since these are ducks, not geese! 😉

Friday find: Gig flyer

Gig flyers have always been a playground for design experimentation, but they are usually not very representative of great typography. I think this one is a step up and I’ll tell you why…

I found this flyer for the Cape Town Folk ‘n Acoustic Music Festival at a coffee shop on my way to work this morning:

The Cape Town Folk 'n Acoustic Music Festival flyer

Gig flyers have always been a playground for design experimentation, but due to their low-fi tradition and the fact that they are probably often created by musicians rather than designers, they are usually not very representative of great typography.

I think this one is a step up and I’ll tell you why:

  1. The informal and somewhat zany geometric display type used for Folk ‘n Acoustic is anchored nicely by the graphic elements (banners, shapes, icons) around it.
  2. The visual hierarchy of information is presented well by the size and weight of the type; first what, then when and where, followed by who, and lastly the sponsors.
  3. The list of artists’ names vary in size and colour, yet the typographic colour (overall density) has been well preserved.
  4. The strong horisontal structure remains unbroken throughout.
  5. Sticking to just two colours (black and red) was a good choice, especially since the background is textured.
  6. Although it is quite text-heavy, there is enough white space for the design to breathe.

Looking at it a little more critically:

  1. I like the fact that designers are breaking free of the old use-no-more-than-two-fonts-per-design mantra, because it does work in many cases, but I have to question whether using five different fonts on the front of the flyer (plus two more on the back!) is necessary? Perhaps exploring a few different weights of a single typeface instead of using different font families would offer a more consistent result.
  2. I’m probably being pedantic here, but the misregistered effect used on music festival is redundent in context of the treatment across the rest of the layout.

Industrious coffee and condensed type at Yourstruly

Yourstruly, located on Long Street in the heart of Cape Town’s city centre, is one of my favourite lunch time spots. One thing I enjoy about it is the DIY ethic…

Yourstruly, located on Long Street in the heart of Cape Town’s city centre, is one of my favourite lunch time spots.

One thing I enjoy about it is the DIY ethic: on any given day you can find owner Daniel Holland enthusiastically serving coffee and sandwiches through the hatch, but that’s not all – he also took care of all the graphic design himself, and his dad did the carpentry!

The graphic identity of Yourstruly is quite appropriately anchored by Trade Gothic, which Jason Santa Maria describes as an honest, dependable and industrious typeface with little flourish or fuss.

Next time you’re in Cape Town and find yourself in need of some good coffee and a strong dose of typography, you know where to go.

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Yourstruly Cafe, Long Street, Cape Town

Find out a little more about Yourstruly and Daniel on Ilovecoffee.co.za.

A peek inside the portfolio of Bruce Mackay

I became aware of Bruce Mackay’s unique illustration style a year ago when I saw a cool drawing he did of a skeleton drinking a beer. Needless to say I was instantly compelled to follow his work online and as it turns out he is a fellow Capetonian…

I became aware of Bruce Mackay’s unique illustration style a year ago when I saw a cool  drawing he did of a skeleton drinking a beer. Needless to say I was instantly compelled to follow his work online and as it turns out he is a fellow Capetonian. Browsing through his portfolio I came across some nice lettering and typographic pieces, take a look:

The work of Bruce Mackay

The work of Bruce Mackay

The work of Bruce Mackay

The work of Bruce Mackay

The work of Bruce Mackay

The work of Bruce Mackay

You can see a lot more killer stuff from Bruce on his blog, Flickr and Bēhance.