Jack Daniel’s label update – part two

About four months ago I mentioned that the Jack Daniel’s label design was being updated. Well, here’s the latest on the subject…

Remember about four months ago I mentioned that the iconic Jack Daniel’s label design was being updated?

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Well, Cue, the agency responsible for this daunting task, updated their website earlier this week with a case study and details of Jack’s new look. Here are a couple of their thoughts on the redesign:

The brand’s values are timeless, but like every great brand, it needed to evolve to maintain its strength and affirm its authenticity. We evaluated the equity of the brand elements, then edited carefully to clarify their meaning. The new label maintains a balance of filigree, iconography, and special typographic elements, in black and white with a touch of silver.

New Jack Daniel’s label:

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

A closer look at details of the packaging applied to the new chiseled bottle shape :

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Elements of the updated identity system:

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

Jack Daniel's label redesign by Cue

An important accompaniment to the new design – The Jack Daniel’s brand guide:

Jack Daniel's booklet by Cue

New Jack Daniel’s is also introducing a new product, Tennessee Honey, which features a unique design incorporating the traditional brand elements :

Jack Daniel's Honey label design by Cue

Jack Daniel's Honey label design by Cue

Found via Allan Peters.

Air tickets reimagined as an app

Sometimes we need to cross the boundaries set by a particular medium or technology in order to challenge the status quo of design.

Earlier this month Sylion launched their new iPhone app Flight Card.

Flight Card is a beautiful, simple and intuitive flight tracking application for your iPhone or iPod touch. Search your flight by flight # or by route, track it and share with family and friends!

Flight Card

Flight Card

Sylion mention in their blog post announcing Flight Card that the concept was inspired by Tyler Thompson’s 2010 reinvention of his boarding pass. I love the minimal approach and the elegant condensed typeface used, which is very similar to Tyler’s original concept:

Boarding pass redesigned by Tyler Thompson

Boarding pass redesigned by Tyler Thompson

Since thermal printers and the systems that produce real-world boarding passes impose so many limitations on innovation, we will not be seeing Tyler’s redesign implemented at airports anytime soon. That’s why it’s awesome that we are able to employ another medium altogether, such as the iPhone, and challenge the status quo!

The humble sales receipt redesigned

Why are till slips so boring? Berg London rethinks the potential of this common, yet overlooked item.

Have you ever thought about the fact that a cash register is a connected device forming part of a world-wide data network? In this regard it is much like your computer or smartphone. Why then, is the output of this device, the common till slip, so… boring?

That is exactly what London based design consultancy Berg thought when Icon Magazine challenged them to rethink an everyday object of their choice.

We think the humble receipt could be something like a paper “app” and be valuable in small and playful ways. – Berg

The result of their exploration is a personalised info-rich little document straight from that uncomfortable place where low tech and high tech collide.

Berg London rethink the till slip

Berg London rethink the till slip

Via: Co.Design

Jason Santa Maria rethinks his website

Who would launch the tenth anniversary redesign of their website on a Friday afternoon? Well, probably only Jason Santa Maria. His twitter bio sums up his unfortunate predicament: “Designer by day, designer by night.”

Who would launch the tenth anniversary redesign of their website on a Friday afternoon? Well, probably only Jason Santa Maria. His twitter bio sums up his unfortunate predicament: “Designer by day, designer by night.”

Based in Brooklyn, New York, Jason has positioned himself as the godfather of modern typographic resources – here are a few of the offices he currently holds:

  • Co-founder of Typedia, which as the name suggests is an online encyclopedia of typefaces
  • Creative director for Typekit, a subscription-based service offering hosted web fonts
  • Lecturer for the Interaction Design program at the School of Visual Arts in NYC
  • Creative director for the online web magazine A List Apart
  • Co-founder/designer of ALA’s publishing wing A Book Apart

The other projects and events he is involved in are innumerable, so instead of trying to figure out whether Jason has a clone army or just never sleeps, go over and take a look at the latest incarnation of jasonsantamaria.com.

The previous version of his website/blog introduced the concept of a custom design for each article as opposed to having entries conform to a rigid template, but this posed an unforeseen problem:

In order to post something, I felt it couldn’t be short or just a quip on a topic, it had to be substantial. I fell into a design trap I unknowingly set for myself. – Jason Santa Maria

Here’s a screenshot of the new home page design which allows posts of various lengths to co-exist in one stream. It features one of my favourite fonts Chaparral for most of the text:

Jason Santa Maria website redesign

Personally I don’t think he is breaking new ground with this less-is-more offering, but when Jason Santa Maria redesigns it is always worth sitting up, taking a good hard look and perhaps even a leaf or two from his book…

Fruita Blanch

I really enjoy the look of Catalonian family business Fruita Blanch. The new fresh minimal identity was designed by Barcelona based studio Atipus. They even developed a custom font used across the board. My favourite aspect is how the labels have been designed to reveal as much of the jar content as possible. Sometimes less really is more.

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Fruita Blanch identity

Via: Identity Designed

Helvetica redesigned

News of Linotype’s latest typeface offering, Neue Haas Grotesk has swept the typosphere since its release on June 7th. The story goes that the famous digital sans-serif  typeface we know today as Helvetica, was originally designed by Max Miedinger in the ’50s as Neue Haas Grotesk. The conversion from metal type to digital resulted in a one-size-fits-all solution with “unfortunate compromises” to the integrity and character of Helvetica’s predecessor.

NYC based type designer Christian Schwartz has now restored this typeface to its former glory and released it comercially. A common perception in the design fraternity is that “you don’t mess with Helvetica”, so I find it quite interesting that the initial reception in typography circles appears to be positive.

Neue Haas Grotesk does not come without any credentials, the typeface has been put through its paces by Bloomberg Businessweek’s print publication since their redesign last year.

My favourite part is that Schwartz has included some of Miedinger’s alternate characters which have never formed part of Helvetica. Take a look at the flat-legged R:

Neue Haas Grotesk

Read more about the revival of this legendary typeface at: