Nice site: Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company has not forgotten the reason we designers got all excited about the prospect of web fonts in the first place: the ability to use real fonts for typographic design instead of replacing text with images…

I don’t often feature websites on here. I guess the whole web font “revolution” of the last two years has sent designers into a flurry of experimentation and the results are often a little underwhelming.

People like Jason Santa Maria and Trent Walton have been nudging us in the right direction, showing us the power that this culmination of typographic awareness, innovation and browser support holds. As we all know, with great power comes great responsibility, and in exploring this new frontier, best practices have been something of a grey area.

But hey, let’s not forget the reason we designers got all excited about the prospect of web fonts in the first place: the ability to use real fonts for typographic design instead of replacing text with images!

Without analysing the design of Cast Iron Design Company‘s website, I simply want to commend them on taking advantage of this ability. The design duo from Tucson, Arizona has made liberal use of web fonts (via Typekit) and CSS3 techniques throughout.

I was a little disappointed though, to find that the header design (which differs from page to page) makes use of image replacement instead of real fonts. Come on guys, you have taken it this far, now how about those headers?

*throws down the gauntlet…*

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

Cast Iron Design Company

To see it for yourself, go to Cast Iron Design Company.

Web Typography for the Lonely

Web Typography for the Lonely is an ongoing collection of experiments and writings on, you guessed it, web type. Each entry features a demo and write-up explaining how the result was achieved.

Do you find your relationship with typography more fulfilling than any other? Do you remember complex lines¬† of Javascript off by heart but forget your best friend’s birthday? Do you feel that CSS3 just may be your soul mate?

If you answered yes to any of these questions the chances are you may end up lonely… but don’t despair, there’s a website for you: WebTypographyfortheLonely.com

Web Typography for the Lonely is an ongoing collection of experiments and writings on web typography and the possibilities of standards-based web design. It aims to inspire the web community by pushing the boundaries of what is both possible and practical in web standards in a manner that is compelling and exciting to the visually-minded creative.

Web Typography for the Lonely

Created and maintained by Baltimore based designer Chris Clark, each entry features a demo and write-up explaining how the result was achieved. Check it out!

Wish list: Explorations in Typography / Mastering the Art of Fine Typesetting

This beautiful typographic reference book with its yellow gilded edges looks like an absolute must-have.

This beautiful typographic reference book with its yellow gilded edges looks like an absolute must-have.

With Explorations in Typography Carolina de Bartolo guides the reader through 24 chapters each exploring different typesetting techniques. Read Patrick Barber’s review for a more thorough account of what to expect from the book.

Explorations in Typography by Carolina de Bartolo

Explorations in Typography by Carolina de Bartolo

Explorations in Typography by Carolina de Bartolo

Explorations in Typography by Carolina de Bartolo

Carolina took two years to complete the book, but what makes it all the more impressive is that this San Francisco based lecturer went the DIY route and published it herself. After finding that the idea was a hard sell for traditional publishers, she had to figure things out as she went along and eventually founded her own publishing company.

Explorations in Typography’s website is certainly worth a visit too. Using a range of web fonts from Typekit, the home page offers an interactive experience in exploring typesetting techniques, each with annotations explaining the merits of the resulting layout.

Better web typography with Javascript

Lettering.js is an innovative jQuery plugin that allows designers to take tweaking of web type to the next level. Combine Lettering.js with the Kern.js bookmarklet and some really interesting things become possible…

Lettering.js is an innovative jQuery plugin that allows designers to take tweaking of web type to the next level. Combine Lettering.js with the Kern.js bookmarklet and some really interesting things become possible!

Here are two articles from Typekit, complete with examples to show you how it’s done: