Vintage travel posters

Russell Johnston and Megan Jones have been collecting vintage Travel and Ski posters since 1979. The collection was started by Russell’s father Robert W Johnston, a Royal Air Force navigator after the Second World War…

Russell Johnston, a lawyer from Essex, and his partner Megan Jones have been collecting vintage Travel and Ski posters since 1979. The collection was started by Russell’s father Robert W Johnston, a Royal Air Force navigator after the Second World War. Russell and Megan are now building an online catalog of these posters by photographing each to museum-reference digital standard. Some of these are being revealed for the first time in over 50 years and as you can imagine, many of them have become a rather valuable investment as collector’s items. Here are a few examples:

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Vintage Travel Posters

Found via: Telegraph Travel.

See many more vintage posters on Megan’s blog Quad Royal.

The flipside of old New York Times photos

The New York Times recently launched a Tumblr to share old pictures from their newsroom archive. More exciting than the photos themselves, is the history recorded on the back of each picture.

The New York Times recently launched The Lively Morgue; a Tumblr to share old pictures from their newsroom archive (nicknamed “The Morgue”).

The photos are intriguing enough and certainly provide excellent fodder for reblogging and pinning enthusiasts, but what really makes this project worth a closer look is that each photo can be “flipped over” to inspect the back. What could possibly be of interest on the back of a photo you ask? Well, you would be surprised!

Layer upon layer of stamps, scribbled annotations and clippings offer a haphazard roadmap to the photo’s history. Things to look out for include subject codes, what the photographer was paid, details of when and how many times the photo was published and of course the accompanying captions.

Call me strange, but I find these way more exciting than the photos themselves:

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Back of picture from NY Times's archive

Read more about this project on the NYT Lens blog.

Vintage Polish packaging

Ok, this is about as random as it gets, but here are a few examples of vintage Polish packaging in the following categories: chocolate and soap…

Ok, this is about as random as it gets, but here are a few examples of vintage Polish packaging in the following categories: chocolate and soap. Just for the sake of typographic curiosity and colour palette inspiration you know…

Chocolate

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Vintage Polish chocolate packaging

Soap

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Vintage Polish soap packaging

Via the Collection category on Pan tu nie stał.

Bonus! Vintage Polish public transport tickets:

Vintage Polish travel tickets

Friday find: The Grapho-Scope and other forgotten art supplies

Whether you are old enough to have used a Grapho-Scope, or whether your first introduction to design was Adobe CS5, check out the online Museum of Forgotten Art Supplies curated by Lou Brooks…

American designer and illustrator Lou Brooks (born 1944 in Pennsylvania) has been in the game longer than most. You know the little Monopoly guy in the top hat? Lou drew that. He witnessed the entire digital revolution and as such, remembers using tools and materials most of us spring chickens have never even heard of.

Whether you are old enough to have used a Grapho-Scope, Shading Film, Non-Repro Blue Pencils and Letraset, or whether your first introduction to design was Adobe CS5, check out the online Museum of Forgotten Art Supplies curated by Lou himself. It will either fill you with nostalgia or puzzlement!

A few examples from the museum’s Artifacts Gallery:

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Forgotten Art Supplies

Found via CreativePro.

Vintage Kodak packaging

Last night I saw an awesome movie called Super 8 which inspired me to find this old film and camera packaging.

Last night I rented an awesome 2011 movie called Super 8. I’m not sure how I completely missed it on the circuit, but I had never heard of it. I guess my brain switched off every time I heard someone mention “super something-or-other”, assuming it was yet another superhero movie…

Turns out I was just uneducated. The title refers to a motion picture film format introduced by Kodak Eastman in 1965. Following it’s 8mm predecessor, this bad boy featured smaller perforations allowing for a larger exposure area, hence the superness.

History lesson aside, during the movie (set in 1979) I noticed the unmistakeable yellow Kodak film packs and it inspired me to look for some more film and camera packaging examples from that period. Fortunately I came across a nice little collection at The Medium Control’s inspiration blog, have a look:

Vintage Kodak packaging

Vintage Kodak packaging

Vintage Kodak packaging

Vintage Kodak packaging

Vintage Kodak packaging

Is that some Eurostile I spy on “INSTANT CARTRIDGE LOAD MOVIE CAMERA”? Also note the little SUPER 8 to the right of the camera.

Vintage Kodak packaging

Vintage Kodak packaging

I love the condensed fonts used on this instamatic camera packaging combined with the extended font used for the model number. Any idea what they are? Those slanted terminals on the S and C of INSTAMATIC are quite distinctive…

Mysterious calligraphic album from the 1620s

These beautifully ornate calligraphic letterforms form part of an album entitled “Kalligraphische Schriftvorlagen” (calligraphic writing styles) produced by Johann Hering of Bavaria, Germany in the 1620s. Were they intended for educational use or simply practice sheets from Hering’s personal collection?

According to BiblyOdyssey, there is not much information available online about Johann Hering or his work as scribe, but what we do know is the majority of this writing is in German (with occasional Latin) and many of the pages contain texts from The Bible.

Aren’t these amazing?

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Calligraphic letterforms by Johann Hering, 1620s

Find out more on BibliOdyssey.

Friday find: Book cover graphics

Julian Montague of Buffalo, New York started documenting interesting book covers from his collection in February 2009. Three years later (and over 1000 covers later) he is still at it…

Julian Montague of Buffalo, New York started documenting interesting book covers from his collection in February 2009. Three years later (and over 1000 covers later) he is still at it!

Here are a few, but this is only scratching the surface:

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Daily Book Graphics

Visit the Daily Book Graphics project by Julian Montague for more. Found via ISO50.

IBM Film Ribbons by Paul Rand

A striking example of Paul Rand’s packaging design work for IBM from the 1960s.

Javier Garcia of San Francisco found this striking example of Paul Rand’s IBM packaging design tucked away in his dad’s office, still wrapped and unused. Javier points out the nice contrast of the white hand lettering against the bold slab-serifed IBM. I agree, it works super well.

Paul Rand IBM packaging

Paul Rand IBM packaging

Paul Rand IBM packaging

Paul Rand produced work for IBM from the 1950s to the late 1990s. The exact date of this particular design is unknown, but thanks to my eagle-eyed forensic analysis of the expiry date (12/6/71) in following picture, and based on the fact that the IBM Selectric Typewriters were only introduced in 1961, this box dates back to the mid 1960s.

Paul Rand IBM packaging

Friday find: Bottle caps

I have always thought of bottle caps as an interesting little canvas and wondered how much attention actually goes into their design, but I had no idea that a passionate community of collectors exists…

I came upon an unusual source of typographic history: bottle caps (aka crowns)! I have always thought of crown caps as an interesting little canvas and wondered how much attention goes into their design, but I had no idea that a passionate community of collectors exists.

Kenny Yohn, “The Bottle Cap Man” is a member of the Crowncap Collectors Society International and boasts over 20,000 beer and soda crowns in his collection. Here are a few (well, to be honest, 160!) good ones I picked from his online gallery for their typographic diversity.

Are they not just too cool!

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

The Bottle Cap Man

Vintage punk rock flyers get swissted

Hey, remember when Jack Black and Mos Def sweded VHS movies in Be Kind Rewind? Well, Swissted is kind of like that, only with punk gig flyers…

Hey, remember when Jack Black and Mos Def sweded VHS movies in Be Kind Rewind (2008)? Well, swissted, an ongoing project by NYC based designer Mike Joyce, is kind of like that…

Only, instead of recreating feature films in a low-fi fashion, he recreates punk rock gig flyers as Swiss style posters. So basically he is taking the punk out of punk, and what could possibly be more punk than that! Odd, but brilliant. (As a loyal supporter of both punk rock and typography, this is right up my alley.)

The number of flyers Mike has swissted is nothing short of astounding – at the time of writing this there are over 200 examples in the gallery! Of course he also has some rules: all posters are 35.5 inches wide by 50 inches high, all set in berthold akzidenz grotesk medium, all lowercase and all the shows actually happened.

Here are but a few examples:

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

Swissted

100th post and 2011 sign-off

This is Typedeck’s 100th post since launching in June this year – a great milestone and a good time to sign off for 2011. Thanks for all the support and positive feedback so far!

Hello friends. This is Typedeck’s 100th post since launching in June this year – a great milestone and a good time to sign off for 2011.

Typedeck has given me the opportunity to explore typography in a new and more intensive way than ever before. I have learned a lot in the past few months and best of all is I am applying this learning to my own design work.

Thanks for all the support and positive feedback so far! Have a fantastic festive season and a blessed Christmas.

Here’s to resuming Typedeck in 2012 with new vigour.

– Imar

To end off the year I have just thrown together a few random bits and pieces of interest. Click on the images to visit the source:

A free font based on the style of lettering seen on Cassandre posters:

Typedeck 100th post

Lettering by Astronaut Design:

Typedeck 100th post

From pilllpat’s Flickr photostream:

Typedeck 100th post

Two items from the Flickr photostream of junkyard.dogs:

Typedeck 100th post

Typedeck 100th post

Type specimen poster from a series featuring Changethethought studio’s  favorite typefaces:

Typedeck 100th post

Mattel Electronics Football from Corey Holms’s Flickr photostream:

Typedeck 100th post

Some smokey lettering by Pablo Alfieri:

Typedeck 100th post

Explore Fontdeck’s typographic advent calendar:

Typedeck 100th post

Hot lettering by Studio Muti:

Typedeck 100th post

Editorial illustration by Telegramme Studio via Black Harbour:

Typedeck 100th post

Poster from Evajuliet’s Etsy store:

Typedeck 100th post

LetterMPress app for Mac and iPad:

Typedeck 100th post

Cover design for The New York Times Magazine Photographs:

Typedeck 100th post

Detail from Old Faithful Shop identity design by Ptarmak:

Typedeck 100th post

Time lapse video of Daniel Cassaro’s (Young Jerks) mural for the Ace Hotel in New York via Xheight LA:

Typedeck 100th post

MailChimp’s Voice & Tone styleguide site via Co. Design:

Typedeck 100th post

Detail from the Tom, Dick & Harry identity by Mike McQuade:

Typedeck 100th post

From Kyle Read’s inspiration Tumblr:

Typedeck 100th post

And finally, is there a new Tumblr logo in the works?

Screenshot of their maintenance page:

Typedeck 100th post

Vintage matchboxes from around the world

A look at the matchboxes of old, adorned with images of battle and grandeur. Oh and some toothpick boxes too.

Mankind’s command of fire is arguably what separates us from the animals on a most basic level. The ability to package that kind of power in a tiny cardboard box and put it in your pocket is nothing short of awe inspiring. No wonder the matchboxes of old used to be adorned with images of battle and grandeur. The bleed and misregistered printing only adds to the appeal. Oh, there are also a few toothpick boxes in the mix. I mean of course reigning supreme over God’s creation with something in your teeth would be simply disgraceful…

Vintage matchboxes

Note to Australian gingers: please remember to wear the correct protective mask when using safety matches.

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

Vintage matchboxes

From a Livejournal post by valaamov_osel and a Flickr set by Shailesh Chavda.

The typographic allure of analogue control panels

In this age of touch screen interaction I think our senses are left underwhelmed by tapping and swiping and we often experience a yearning for the tactile response of dials buttons and gauges…

In this age of touch screen interaction I think our senses are left underwhelmed by tapping and swiping and we often experience a yearning for the tactile response of dials buttons and gauges. This is evident in the contemporary application of retro design aesthetics, for example BERG’s Little Printer and Jonas Eriksson’s 76 Synthesizer iPad app. Typography plays an understated but indispensable role in any analogue interface.

I came across this intriguing Flickr Group Pool entitled Control Panel. Here are a few delicious samples to fuel your nostalgia:

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

The typography of analogue control panels

Friday find: Racing decals from the 1970s

I have always been a sucker for stickers, so it’s no surprise that these caught my attention…

I have always been a sucker for stickers, so it’s no surprise that amongst sarcoptiform’s eclectic Flickr collection including art, tea tags, found photographs and magazine covers, these are what caught my attention:

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

And finally, here is a goggle-wearing owl emerging from a cloud of smoke inside a big X. Your argument is invalid.

Vintage 1970s Racing Decals

Vintage French type specimen books

A few beautiful pages from old French type specimen books.

I found these in pilllpat (agence eureka)’s Flickr photostream. She has a huge collection of high res scans from old publications, well worth a look.

Album du peintre en batîment (1882):

Interesting to note the missing W from these earlier specimens as it was very rarely used in French.

Album du peintre en batîment 01

Album du peintre en batîment 02

Album du peintre en batîment 03

Album du peintre en batîment 04

100 Alphabets Publicitaires (1946):

Alphabets Publicitaires 01

Alphabets Publicitaires 02

Alphabets Publicitaires 03

Alphabets Publicitaires 04

La Lettre (1957):

La Lettre 01

La Lettre 02

La Lettre 03

La Lettre 04

Amazing vintage cigarette pack designs from around the world

Smoking or non-smoking, be sure to take a look at these fantastic cigarette pack designs from yesteryear, collected from different countries around the world…

Christian Kranich of Vienna, Austria has a mammoth collection of cigarette packs representative of over 150 countries and spanning several decades. I have never smoked a cigarette in my life, so for me to sit drooling over their packaging is unusual to say the least. Believe it or not, there are some typographic gems amongst them and I have just spent way too much time exploring his online database not to share a few of my favourites, well 160 of them to be precise!

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Cigarette packs from around the world

Find loads more information about the individual packs on Zigsam – the Austrian cigarette collection. Although the packs are archived by brand and country, I must warn you that browsing is not an easy task…

Friday find: Boxing posters

Check out these awesome boxing posters from the 1930s and 40s.

The style of vintage boxing posters is one that has surged in popularity in recent times and can be found applied to everything from websites to wedding invitations. As Matt Willey of Studio8 Design points out:

The arrangement of the type is a result, I presume, of a simple need to get all this information on the poster – nothing more fancy than that. They are probably more appealing now than they were considered at the time.

1934:

Vintage boxing posters

1942:

Vintage boxing posters

Imagine the chilling experience of being pitted against someone called Dick Freezer (above).

1949:

Vintage boxing posters

Via Eye Magazine Blog.

Vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three is a blog by Seattle-based Jive Time Records, showcasing a fantastic collection of record sleeve designs, categorised by motif…

Project Thirty Three is a blog by Seattle-based Jive Time Records, showcasing a fantastic collection of record sleeve designs. The way they are categorised by motif (Circles and Dots, Squares and Rectangles, Lines and Stripes) makes for fun browsing. As far as I can tell, the sleeves are mainly from the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

The seemingly infinite number of vintage record jackets that convey their message with only simple shapes and typography never cease to amaze us.

Sometimes less really is more! Look at these fine specimens:

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Project Thirty Three vintage record sleeves

Found via Allan Peters.

Fantastic, strange, incredible, super, amazing comic book mastheads!

John Hilgart calls himself a curator of lost items. Among his assortment of finds, is SUPERTYPE! – a collection of high res vintage comic book mastheads to marvel at…

John Hilgart calls himself a curator of lost items. Among his assortment of finds, is  SUPERTYPE! – a collection of high res vintage comic book mastheads to marvel at. Most of these date back to the 1960s and 1970s, aka the Silver Age of comics. Here are a few examples:

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

SUPERTYPE! Comic Book Mastheads

Friday find: Typewriter ribbon tins

Janine Vangool from Calgary, Canada has a great collection of vintage typewriter ribbon tins. How cool!

Janine Vangool from Calgary, Canada has a great collection of vintage typewriter ribbon tins. How cool:

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

This last one is my personal favourite:

Janine Vangool's typewriter ribbon tin collection

See more in Janine’s Flicker set and read an interview with her about the collection on Poppytalk.

Friday find: Vintage erasers

Lovely eraser branding and packaging from yesteryear… and a skateboard deck!

1940s Vintage Eberhard Faber Ruby Eraser Box via Swiss Miss:

Vintage eraser branding

Vintage erasers from Lisa Kongdon’s A Collection A Day:

Vintage eraser branding

And in sticking with the theme, a skate deck entitled “Big Mistake” hand painted by Jennifer Daniel for Bordo Bello Auction:

Pink Pearl eraser skate deck

The typography of Water for Elephants

A fascinating example of how graphic design plays a vital role in movie production, yet goes virtually unnoticed amidst the drama!

My wife finally dragged me kicking and screaming to sit down and watch Water for Elephants with her on DVD. A tearjerking romantic drama was not at the top of my list of fun ways to spend a Saturday night, but I must admit it wasn’t that bad.

Throughout the film I was impressed by the attention to detail in the set design. It was clear that a lot of work went into the graphic design and the vintage circus typography.

Realising that I am probably not the only one whose attention was caught, I Googled the subject to see what others have said. I instantly hit gold – a write-up from Karen TenEyck, the graphic designer responsible! I recommend reading the article as it contains a lot of fascinating behind-the-scenes insight. Download it here a a PDF:

ADG Perspective Magazine Jun/Jul 2011, pages 34 – 41 (1.6MB).

Working with production designer Jack Fisk, art director David Crank and set decorator Jim Erickson, Karen produced a mammoth collection of posters, banners, signs, branding and packaging used to give the film that convincing 1930s atmosphere.

Another challenge for period films is that fonts made for the computer do not do justice to the hand-crafted look of the time, even if they are based on old styles. They are simply too perfect. Yet with the current trend of less and less prep time, I needed to find ways to shortcut the process and get the same effects. One of the ways I have been able to do this is by creating my own fonts based on the fifty-plus period lettering and advertising books I own. I am able to give these fonts the imperfect look of hand-drawn letters done with a lettering brush. Because they are turned into fonts that I can type with, it speeds up the process considerably down the line as decisions are made closer to filming. – Karen TenEyck

Take a look at some of Karen’s work in action:

Water for Elephants graphic design by Karen TenEyck

Water for Elephants graphic design by Karen TenEyck

Water for Elephants graphic design by Karen TenEyck

Water for Elephants graphic design by Karen TenEyck

Water for Elephants graphic design by Karen TenEyck

Finally, the film also has a very nice end title screen which was not designed by Karen, but by a Los Angeles studio called River Road Creative:

Water for Elephants end title

Friday find: Flight thru Instruments, 1945

How awesome is this rare military flight manual from 1945? That front cover couldn’t be more perfect.

An excerpt from the foreword:

The pilot who cannot fly through instruments, therefore, consigns himself and his plane to a part time job and places both in the premodern era where usefulness was limited by the amount of daylight and visibility.

Flight thru Instruments, 1945

Flight thru Instruments, 1945

Flight thru Instruments, 1945

Via: Prof. Michael Stoll’s Flickr

Incredible vintage typography from Sanborn Map Company

Examples of the incredible variety of ornate typographic titles which appeared on Sanborn Maps between 1880 and 1920.

Founded in 1866 by Daniel Alfred Sanborn, a surveyor from Massachusetts, The Sanborn Company began making fire insurance maps in 1867. The company first gained recognition for the rich detail employed in the maps they produced in the 1800s, and today these archived maps are still widely used for research purposes. Sanborn still exists as a mapping and GIS company.

The images below are examples of the incredible variety of ornate typographic titles which appeared on maps between 1880 and 1920.

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

Sanborn Maps

See more at BibliOdyssey.

Figural Cameos

Cameo refers to type design in which the characters are reversed out of a black background. In figural cameos, the background typically depicts the product or service being advertised.

Cameo refers to type design in which the characters are reversed out of a dark background. In figural cameos, the background typically depicts the product or service being advertised. Judging by the dates on some of these vintage mail items, this form of branding reached it’s height in the 1800s, although I have seen quite a few contemporary designs referencing this unique artform.

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

Figural Cameo

I originally came across these images on Miss Moss and traced some more info on The Trade Card Place.

Create vintage type with Adobe Illustrator

Method and Craft is a great new resource for designers. These two posts highlight two different techniques for applying a vintage look to your type in Adobe Illustrator.

Method and Craft is a great new resource for designers. These two posts highlight two different techniques for applying a vintage look to your type in Adobe Illustrator:

Vintage Effects Within Illustrator (video)

Old is the New New